The worlds first carbon neutral salmon

We believe that the future of food production should be carbon neutral. That is why we want to offer carbon-neutral salmon and trout to our customers from our fish farms in the Norwegian fjords.

Salmon with a history

The Eide family have been pioneering the development of the farmed salmon industry since Knut Johan Eide started with fish farms in 1970. Since then, three generations have continued to develop the business with the same ideology in mind: that a focus on quality in all parts of the business creates a healthy business in the long run.

We see it as our obligation to contribute to a long-term and sustainable development of the local environment, both for people, fish and nature. Nature, hard-working individuals, and technological innovation have brought us where we are today, and will continue to carry us into the future as well.

The Eide-family has produced food at their homestead Luren since 1917. In the decades that followed, Knut Johan Eide made attempts at both fruit and vegetable production, but the soil was poor and the crops were small.

In the 1960’s Knut Johan tried keeping sheep at the farm. He cared deeply for the animals and was especially interested in the breeding process. However, it was important for him to have more than one stream of income, so he also started with poultry.

At this time he was enlisted to the Norwegian Armed Forces and on the long ferry trip to Bergen, the discussion often took place as to how they were going to make a living in their home valley of Hålandsdalen.

In 1951 there was a land reform in the area. The homestead Luren owned the small parcel “Holmen” down by the lake Skogseitvatnet. The parcel was only 3-4 acres and the agricultural value was put to zero. However, Knut Johan sensed a potential and wanted to keep the parcel instead of trading it for better soil. Today, this parcel hosts our head office and our smolt production facilities.

The 1960s was a tough time for the family. Knut Johan’s wife Bjørg was diagnosed with diabetes 1, a serious illness at the time. Shortly after, a whole generation of poultry was lost. In 1968 Knut Johan quit his job in the military to make his third attempt at creating a livelihood at the farm; this time by farming fish in the lake. The farm was homemade, and knowledge was exchanged between the local entrepreneurs in the region.

Knut Frode, Knut Johan’s’ son, left a promising future in the oil industry in 1984 to enter fish farming. They saw the potential of a big industry but knew that the capacity of the lake was limited. Therefore, Knut Frode brought the company from the lake to the deep Hardanger fjord in 1986. Here, the salmon has ideal conditions with clean water and good currents.

Food production in the sea has always been and still is the life of the Eide family. Most of our family holidays and weekend trips took place on the farm or the boat combined with work. The picture shows a typical summer day for the Eide family in the farming vessel in 1991 with good mood, a good meal, fishing and food production.

The apple never falls far from the tree. Like ripples in water, the Eide generations follow each other. Knut Frode ended his journey too early in 2018, but the traditions for food production in the fjords lives and the visions for the future lives on by the third generation of Eide salmon farmers.

Erlend takes the position as technical manager and with his background as an engineer from NTNU he speeds up the digital transformation and implementation of new technology.

Sondre takes on the role as CEO and starts setting the course for the future of aquaculture while maintaining the focus on the people, the fish and the fjord.

We are proud to announce that we, as far as we know, are the first to offer our customers carbon neutral salmon. Now we would like to show you how we do it.

Our geographical location in deep fjords gives us an additional advantage as it is shielded by tall, snowy mountains and tempered seawater from the gulf stream combined with melding water from the surrounding glaciers. With short transport routes for both fish and feed and a good infrastructure for electricity and transport, our salmon gets a head start.

Our localities and our region have an extra good starting point, with a short transport route for both feed and fish, and well-developed infrastructure for electricity and shipping both along the roads and in the sea.

Our journey to becoming carbon neutral started in 2016 when we made a commitment to electrify all our salmon farms, a process that has significantly reduced our direct CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Our electricity is produced from hydropower in Hålandsdalen, located only a short distance from our homestead on Luren.

To further reduce our own emissions going forward we will start working on electrifying our vessels. However, the indirect emissions from feed ingredients account for most of the carbon footprint of a salmon. Therefore we eliminated Brazilian soy from our feed and have started investments and research into new feed ingredients with lower carbon footprints such as insects or macroalgae.

Despite all these measures, there will still be remaining emissions that we are not in a position to eliminate ourselves today. Therefore, we have chosen to offset these emissions by working with Natural Capital Partners to provide essential funds to carbon finance projects. We are proud supporters of two projects today, one in Malawi and one in the United States

Finally, an independent third-party audits our LCA analysis of the carbon footprint from roe to plate to ensure it is correct. They also ensure that the projects we support actually contribute to offset emissions corresponding to our unavoidable emissions. This is how we produce Salmon Zero and achieve our CarbonNeutral® Product certificate.

Salmon with a history

The Eide family have been pioneering the development of the farmed salmon industry since Knut Johan Eide started with fish farms in 1970. Since then, three generations have continued to develop the business with the same ideology in mind: that a focus on quality in all parts of the business creates a healthy business in the long run.

We see it as our obligation to contribute to a long-term and sustainable development of the local environment, both for people, fish and nature. Nature, hard-working individuals, and technological innovation have brought us where we are today, and will continue to carry us into the future as well. 

The Eide-family has produced food at their homestead Luren since 1917. In the decades that followed, Knut Johan Eide made attempts at both fruit and vegetable production, but the soil was poor and the crops were small.

In the 1960’s Knut Johan tried keeping sheep at the farm. He cared deeply for the animals and was especially interested in the breeding process. However, it was important for him to have more than one stream of income, so he also started with poultry.

At this time he was enlisted to the Norwegian Armed Forces and on the long ferry trip to Bergen, the discussion often took place as to how they were going to make a living in their home valley of Hålandsdalen.

In 1951 there was a land reform in the area. The homestead Luren owned the small parcel “Holmen” down by the lake Skogseitvatnet. The parcel was only 3-4 acres and the agricultural value was put to zero. However, Knut Johan sensed a potential and wanted to keep the parcel instead of trading it for better soil. Today, this parcel hosts our head office and our smolt production facilities.

The 1960s was a tough time for the family. Knut Johan’s wife Bjørg was diagnosed with diabetes 1, a serious illness at the time. Shortly after, a whole generation of poultry was lost. In 1968 Knut Johan quit his job in the military to make his third attempt at creating a livelihood at the farm; this time by farming fish in the lake. The farm was homemade, and knowledge was exchanged between the local entrepreneurs in the region.

Knut Frode, Knut Johan’s’ son, left a promising future in the oil industry in 1984 to enter fish farming. They saw the potential of a big industry but knew that the capacity of the lake was limited. Therefore, Knut Frode brought the company from the lake to the deep Hardanger fjord in 1986. Here, the salmon has ideal conditions with clean water and good currents.

Food production in the sea has always been and still is the life of the Eide family. Most of our family holidays and weekend trips took place on the farm or the boat combined with work. The picture shows a typical summer day for the Eide family in the farming vessel in 1991 with good mood, a good meal, fishing and food production.

The apple never falls far from the tree. Like ripples in water, the Eide generations follow each other. Knut Frode ended his journey too early in 2018, but the traditions for food production in the fjords lives and the visions for the future lives on by the third generation of Eide salmon farmers.

Erlend takes the position as technical manager and with his background as an engineer from NTNU he speeds up the digital transformation and implementation of new technology.

Sondre takes on the role as CEO and starts setting the course for the future of aquaculture while maintaining the focus on the people, the fish and the fjord.

We are proud to announce that we, as far as we know, are the first to offer our customers carbon neutral salmon. Now we would like to show you how we do it.

Salmon with a history

The Eide family have been pioneering the development of the farmed salmon industry since Knut Johan Eide started with fish farms in 1970. Since then, three generations have continued to develop the business with the same ideology in mind: that a focus on quality in all parts of the business creates a healthy business in the long run.

We see it as our obligation to contribute to a long-term and sustainable development of the local environment, both for people, fish and nature. Nature, hard-working individuals, and technological innovation have brought us where we are today, and will continue to carry us into the future as well.

The Eide-family has produced food at their homestead Luren since 1917. In the decades that followed, Knut Johan Eide made attempts at both fruit and vegetable production, but the soil was poor and the crops were small.

In the 1960’s Knut Johan tried keeping sheep at the farm. He cared deeply for the animals and was especially interested in the breeding process. However, it was important for him to have more than one stream of income, so he also started with poultry.

At this time he was enlisted to the Norwegian Armed Forces and on the long ferry trip to Bergen, the discussion often took place as to how they were going to make a living in their home valley of Hålandsdalen.

In 1951 there was a land reform in the area. The homestead Luren owned the small parcel “Holmen” down by the lake Skogseitvatnet. The parcel was only 3-4 acres and the agricultural value was put to zero. However, Knut Johan sensed a potential and wanted to keep the parcel instead of trading it for better soil. Today, this parcel hosts our head office and our smolt production facilities.

The 1960s was a tough time for the family. Knut Johan’s wife Bjørg was diagnosed with diabetes 1, a serious illness at the time. Shortly after, a whole generation of poultry was lost. In 1968 Knut Johan quit his job in the military to make his third attempt at creating a livelihood at the farm; this time by farming fish in the lake. The farm was homemade, and knowledge was exchanged between the local entrepreneurs in the region.

Knut Frode, Knut Johan’s’ son, left a promising future in the oil industry in 1984 to enter fish farming. They saw the potential of a big industry but knew that the capacity of the lake was limited. Therefore, Knut Frode brought the company from the lake to the deep Hardanger fjord in 1986. Here, the salmon has ideal conditions with clean water and good currents.

Food production in the sea has always been and still is the life of the Eide family. Most of our family holidays and weekend trips took place on the farm or the boat combined with work. The picture shows a typical summer day for the Eide family in the farming vessel in 1991 with good mood, a good meal, fishing and food production.

The apple never falls far from the tree. Like ripples in water, the Eide generations follow each other. Knut Frode ended his journey too early in 2018, but the traditions for food production in the fjords lives and the visions for the future lives on by the third generation of Eide salmon farmers.

Erlend takes the position as technical manager and with his background as an engineer from NTNU he speeds up the digital transformation and implementation of new technology.

Sondre takes on the role as CEO and starts setting the course for the future of aquaculture while maintaining the focus on the people, the fish and the fjord.

We are proud to announce that we, as far as we know, are the first to offer our customers carbon neutral salmon. Now we would like to show you how we do it.

The Atlantic salmon has a naturally low carbon footprint since its body temperature adapts to the outside temperature and it does not have to use any energy to hold up its body weight in the water.

Our geographical location in deep fjords shielded by tall, snowy mountains and tempered sea water from the gulf stream combined with melding water from the surrounding glaciers gives us an additional advantage. With short transport routes for both fish and feed, and a good infrastructure for electricity and transport gives our salmon a head start.

Our journey to becoming carbon neutral started in 2016 when we made a commitment to electrify all our salmon farms, a process that has significantly reduced our direct CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Our electricity is produced from hydropower in Hålandsdalen, located only a short distance from our homestead on Luren.

To further reduce our own emissions going forward we will start working on electrifying our vessels. However, the indirect emissions from feed ingredients account for most of the carbon footprint of a salmon. Therefore we eliminated Brazilian soy from our feed and have started investments and research into new feed ingredients with lower carbon footprints such as insects or macroalgae.

Despite all these measures, there will still be remaining emissions that we are not in a position to eliminate ourselves today. Therefore, we have chosen to offset these emissions by working with Natural Capital Partners to provide essential funds to carbon finance projects. We are proud supporters of two projects today, one in Malawi and one in the United States

Finally, an independent third-party audits our LCA analysis of the carbon footprint from roe to plate to ensure it is correct. They also ensure that the projects we support actually contribute to offset emissions corresponding to our unavoidable emissions. This is how we produce Salmon Zero and achieve our CarbonNeutral® Product certificate.

Short text that the next generation tek over, Knut Frode and Randi took the step from the lake to the sea and the Hardangerfjord.

Me is proud to announce that our work today has become carbon neutral. As far as me is aware, me is the princely salmon breeder who reaches this goal.

We would like to invite our customers to visit us and see firsthand how we produce our salmon and taste our product. That is why we are building the Salmon Eye Visitorcenter which is planned to open in 2021. Welcome!